Career & Money

6 Tips On Asking For A Salary Raise

salary raise

To increase the chances of getting the raise that is asked for, don’t rush into your boss’ office without being prepared. Use these 5 tips when asking for a salary raise:

Tip #1 Find Out the Procedures
The first thing to do is to find out what are the procedures for a pay raise at the company that you are working for. Be sure you are in compliance with all requirements. Some possible requirements might include:

  • Minimal score on a recent evaluation
  • Attendance compliance
  • A year since the last salary raise

Tip #2 Evaluate Your Own Performance
Evaluate your job performance yourself. Do you really feel you deserve a raise? You will not have firm ground if you walk in and your only reason for a raise is that it has been awhile since the last raise and everything costs more now. If your performance has not been its best, wait a few months, improve your job performance and then ask for a raise.

Have the previous evaluation handy to refer to. If there were improvements or goals that were suggested, be ready to give examples how you have made the improvements and met your goals.

Tip #3 List Your Contributions To The Company
Have a list of the reasons that you think you should have a raise. The list should have reasons that are based on your job skills and performance improvements since the last raise. No employer ever wants to hear:I should have a raise because ________ makes more than me and I work harder”.

Tip #4 Set Up the Appointment
When you are ready with concrete reasons why you deserve a raise don’t randomly approach your boss. Make an appointment to speak to him or her and try to avoid the following days: Monday (busiest day of the week) and Friday (everyone is focused on their weekend plans).

Be prompt (early is best) for the appointment. Ask for the raise with confidence. Present your reasons and remain professional. If an answer cannot be given immediately, ask when would be the latest to hear about the results of the salary raise. Follow-up a few days after the date given and ask about the status of the raise request.

Tip #5 Don’t Get To Personal There may be many reasons you’re for asking a salary raise: Maybe an increase in living expenses or those fabulous boots , but don’t use that in the conversation. Instead focus on your achievements for the company.

Tip #6 Sit Back And Listen
Don’t give up. Sometimes even when you do everything correct when requesting a raise and you have excellent evaluations, the salary raise will not be approved. It is OK to ask the reason/s the raise was not approved. Find out what you can do to increase the chances of having a salary raise approved. It is a good idea to find out what is an appropriate time to wait between salary raise requests is. Mark your calendar and try again.

It can be downright scary to ask for a pay rise, but remember this: You will never get a salary raise if you don’t ask!

(1) Comment

  1. Alex Truedman says:

    It’s reasonable to have plans about your salary raise when you can be objective or at least close to objective when it comes to evaluation. Weighting all pros and cons and evaluation your own performance can turn you all the way around the idea you need a raise in the first place. Moreover, think if you’re complying with your contract fro 100% and work out our best. I mean, not for everyone else, think about it for yourself. The point is, when you success at work is viable, it’s viable not only for you, so yur emplyer will be the first one to offer you are raise seeing you as an indespensible employee. Otherwise, they are either don’t see it, or don’t want to see. in the second case the nest way is to quit, probably. Anyway, if you can go on with your current salary and don’t go for your lender every month to get extra money till the next payroll (more on loansmob.com), think twice if the salary raise you see for yourself is actually connected to the current employer, or the best way to get more money is to shift jobs.

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